Mnemonic City: Moving Streets

With Mnemonic City: Moving Streets, the project returned to London, after its first overseas show in Madrid a few months earlier. As with the previous exhibition, the group uses this new instance of the project as an opportunity to analyze existing aspects of the group dynamic and identify common approaches and subjects between the different artists, in order to clarify the overall concept and objectives of the Mnemonic City project. During this process, a common interest in ordinary and sometimes hidden aspects of outdoor city life  became more apparent, in particular a flaneur-like approach to the experience of the urban environment. By giving this approach an art historical context, namely by exploring the Situationist movement of the 1960ies and the concept of Psycho Geography, a methodology for project development started to emerge, whereby the group would organize collective walks in and around Ridley Road Market in Dalston, North London, where Doomed Gallery is located. The sharing of thoughts, observations and ideas during these walks served as inspiration for the works of the different artists and performers involved in the project.

 

The pieces on show are a direct response to the particular experience of Ridley Road Market and the artists’ perception and interaction with the trade taking place there. The starting point of Moving Streets was to present the market as a question to the participating artists that seems simple when viewed as a single system – as a place of exchange. However, in the course of the group’s interaction it revealed itself as a complex organism, which reflects and contains an archetypal world of trade.
Doomed Gallery is situated right in the middle of Ridley Road. The market is among the most gloriously chaotic of London’s markets, a joyful collision of colours, sounds and smells.
The cultural differences, which form the unity of the market, the idea of a place of trade versus a public place, and the basic needs that preserve the market’s existence, all contribute to an artistic response which is an exploration rather than an answer. Moving Streets presents the immediate perception of the market in an emotional response that attempts to question ideas of the ‘spectacle’ as a central mechanism of society.

 

Mnemonic City: Plato’s Cave was on show at Doomed Gallery in Dalston, London, on the 26/27 of April 2013. Participating artists where  Anna Burel, Ines von Bonhorst, Jaime Valtierra, Julien Thomasset, Ken Flaherty, Pascal Ancel Bartholdi, Rodrigo Cesar, Rupert Jaeger Yasmine Dainelli and Yuri Pirondi.

© by Mnemonic City, all rights reserved

Rodrigo Cesar

Rodrigo Cesar, who is originally from Portugal, is a London based artist working in a variety of media, with a focus on sculpture, installation and video. He has exhibited extensively in London and across Europe.

Rodrigo’s work experiments with the juxtaposition of appropriated and found materials that are extracted from a day-to-day context. Thematically, his work is based on a resistance to the logic of a capitalist market system, and it challenges the binaries of a continually reconstructed Self and Other, which oscillates between our own ‘cannibal’ and ‘civilized’ selves.

Rodrigo Cesar first collaborated on ‘Moving Streets’  in London in April 2013 and has been a regular Guest Artist since.

Mnemonic City Projects:
Mnemonic City: Florence
Inter-Scape
Moving Streets

websites:
www.vimeo.com/rodrigocesar

 

Max Max

Max  Max is a self thought artist and object collector, interested in anything that is left behind. His work reflects his nomadic life and therefore the streets of London.

He does not have a website or mobile phone, but anyone is more than welcome to meet him personally.

Max Max collaborated on the Mnemonic City project ‘Moving Streets’  in London in April 2013.

Mnemonic City Projects:
Moving Streets

 

© by Mnemonic City, all rights reserved

Ken Flaherty

Ken Flaherty is an artist and photographer living and working in London. He  has also been active for many years as a curator and event organiser, and currently runs Doomed Gallery, located in Dalston in North London.

Ken Flaherty  collaborated on the Mnemonic City project ‘Moving Streets’  in April 2013.

 

Mnemonic City Projects:
Moving Streets

website:
www.doomedgallery.com

© by Mnemonic City, all rights reserved

Julien Thomasset

Julien Thomasset, who is originally from the South of France, studied Visual Communication at the Kent Institute of Art and Design, in Maidstone UK, where he obtained a BA in Illustration. He is a painter and illustrator who has extensively exhibited in London, France and across Europe. He currently lives between London and Antibes, France.

Julien approaches the medium of painting in a unique way, by experimenting extensively with unusual painting/drawing materials as well as using found objects as a base of his artworks. His subject matter focuses on the urban environment on the one hand, and on the human figure and spiritual concepts on the other. He is extremely prolific, sketching daily and also experimenting in other artistic areas such as performance and music.

Julien Thomasset first collaborated on the Mnemonic City Project for ‘Moving Streets’ in April 2013 and has been a regular Guest Artist of the project since.

Mnemonic City Projects:
Inter-Scape
Moving Streets

website:
www.julienthomasset.com

© by Mnemonic City, all rights reserved

 

Yasmine Dainelli

Yasmine Dainelli, who is originally from Florence, Italy, studied under Professor Adriano Bimbi at the Academy of Fine Arts in Florence, after which she obtained a Master’s Degree in printmaking from the International School of Graphic Art – the “Il Bisonte” – in Florence.

Yasmine’s preferred media are sketching, printmaking and etching,  and her work is based on a sensory research, with a particular interest in instant and intuitive gestures. Using heavy contrasts of black and white and the strong lines allow her to bring life the surfaces of the things she portrays. Yasmine has exhibited extensively in the UK, Italy and throughout Europe, and she as also won a number of prestigious awards.

Yasmine Dainelli first collaborated on the Mnemonic City project for ‘Moving Streets‘ in April 2013, and has been one of the key artists of the project since. She has also been making major contributions to the ongoing organisation of the project.

Mnemonic City Projects:
Mnemonic City: Florence
Moving Streets

website:
www.yasminedainelli.blogspot.fr

© by Mnemonic City, all rights reserved